Basic Statistics for Infection Preventionists Virtual Learning Lab

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If you registered for this course but have not received the instructions via email, please contact education@apic.org.

Learn about the role of statistics in infection prevention, steps in statistical analysis, and how to directly apply your new skills with commonly used tools in this four-week online course. Get the foundation you need to better analyze and present data through an interactive course format and test yourself post-class with a knowledge and skills check. The course features live instructor presentations archived for later viewing, group discussions, individual take-home assignments, and assessments.

Going to miss a webinar? No problem! All presentations are recorded and available 24-48 hours after the live event for your viewing within the course’s 4-week period.

Continuing Nursing Education Credits (CNEs) are a recognized method of quantifying participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction. One contact hour is defined as one hour of time spent in an educational experience.

APIC is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

CEs: Attendees will be able to earn between 4-8 CNEs for this activity, and can only be obtained through completion of the online evaluation.

Download learning lab overview.

Please note that for the registration to be processed and access granted to the attendee, payment must be received with the form by July 27.

CANCELLATION POLICY

If you cancel in writing by Thursday, August 4th, your registration will be refunded less a $75 administrative free. No refunds for cancellations received after this date. No shows are non-refundable. Substitutes are allowed.

Your Module Schedule

Daniel Bronson-Lowe, PhD, CIC

Module 1: Descriptive Statistics

Monday, August 1, 2016
1:00pm – 2:00pm ET – 60 minute duration

Topics

  • Why we need statistics in infection prevention
  • Descriptive vs. inferential statistics
  • Quantitative vs. categorical data
  • Measures of central tendency
  • Measures of spread
  • Quartiles / percentiles

Objectives

After viewing the presentation and completing the related activities, the learner will be able to:

  • Explain the difference between descriptive and inferential statistics
  • Explain the difference between quantitative and categorical data
  • Define measures of central tendency and measures of spread

Methodology

The following instructional methodologies are used in this module:

  • Instructor presentation
  • Group discussion
  • Individual take-home activities

Daniel Bronson-Lowe, PhD, CIC

Module 2: Inferential Statistics

Monday, August 8, 2016
1:00pm – 2:00pm ET – 60 minute duration

Topics

  • Steps in statistical analysis (very brief)
  • Null vs alternative hypotheses
  • P-values, confidence intervals, level of significance, power, sample size
  • Type I and Type II error
  • Statistical significance vs. clinical relevance

Objectives

  • Differentiate between null and alternative hypotheses
  • Interpret p-values and confidence intervals
  • Explain the difference between statistical significance and clinical relevance

Methodology

The following instructional methodologies are used in this module:

  • Instructor presentation
  • Group discussion
  • Individual take-home activities

Daniel Bronson-Lowe, PhD, CIC

Module 3: Ratios, Rates, and Proportions (Part I)

Monday, August 15, 2016
1:00pm – 2:00pm ET – 60 minute duration

Topics

  • Ratios, rates, and proportions (multiple examples of each)
  • Incidence vs. prevalence
  • Direct vs. indirect standardization
  • SIR calculation and interpretation
    o Including determination of statistical significance

Objectives

  • Define and interpret ratios, rates, and proportions
  • Differentiate between incidence and prevalence
  • Interpret standardized infection ratios (SIR)

Methodology

The following instructional methodologies are used in this module:

  • Instructor presentation
  • Group discussion
  • Individual take-home activities

Daniel Bronson-Lowe, PhD, CIC

Module 4: Ratios, Rates, and Proportions (Part II)

Monday, August 22, 2016
1:00pm – 2:00pm ET – 60 minute duration

Topics

  • Relative risk
    o Cohort studies
    o Determination of statistical significance
  • Odds ratios
    o Case-control studies
    o Determination of statistical significance
  • Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value
    o Conditional probabilities vs. natural frequencies

Objectives

  • Interpret relative risks and odds ratios
  • Interpret sensitivity and specificity
  • Interpret positive and negative predictive values

Methodology

The following instructional methodologies are used in this module:

  • Instructor presentation
  • Group discussion
  • Individual take-home activities
  • Group de-brief

 

Why Should You Attend?

The overarching course goal is to for learners to understand basic statistical tools and commonly-used statistical methods. At the end of this practical skills-level course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the different types of quantitative data
  • Explain the different types of categorical data
  • Describe the various measures of central tendency
  • Describe the various measures of spread
  • Explain the difference between descriptive and inferential statistics
  • Describe the various measures of frequency
  • Explain the concept of measures of association
  • Define null hypothesis
  • Define alternative hypothesis
  • Explain the concept of p-value
  • Explain reliability, sensitivity, and specificity
  • Differentiate between positive and negative predictive value
  • Explain what “percentiles” mean
  • Define what the Standardized Infection Ratio (SIR) reports
  • Generate a SIR

 

 

Meet the Instructor

Dan Bronson-Lowe, PhD, CIC
Baxter Healthcare

Daniel Bronson-Lowe is an infectious disease epidemiologist by training, a statistics teacher by necessity, and an infection preventionist by luck. He has worked as an infectious disease epidemiologist for the Arizona Department of Health Services, taught health data analysis at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, served on the infection prevention team at Carle Hospital and Physician Group for seven years, and now works at Baxter Healthcare. He is a member of both APIC and SHEA (Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America). He earned his master’s and doctorate degrees in epidemiology and his bachelor’s in microbiology from the University of Arizona.

 

What to expect

Interested in enrolling? This is what you can expect

Everything in the Learning Lab will be done virtually, from listening to speakers to doing assignments. Each of the class’s modules follow this pattern:

Virtual Class
Your week starts with a Virtual-Instructor-Led class. (You can find the schedule above on the course main page). The instructor will start class by looking at the previous week’s homework, then will talk about that week’s content.

Homework
Each week, you will have a homework assignment to let you apply concepts presented during the class. Assessments may include, but are not limited to, test questions, at-work projects, and videos.

Please note that for the registration to be processed and access granted to the attendee, payment must be received with the form by July 27.

CANCELLATION POLICY

If you cancel in writing by Thursday, August 4th, your registration will be refunded less a $75 administrative free. No refunds for cancellations received after this date. No shows are non-refundable. Substitutes are allowed.

The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. (APIC) is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation (ANCC).

Module evaluations will be available at the start of each learning lab through a link provided on the course homepage/discussion board. All course-related evaluations must be completed within 30 days of course completion. After satisfying all evaluation requirements, a certificate of completion will be available to print and/or for your records indicating CEUs.

Accredited status does not imply endorsement by APIC or the American Nurses Credentialing Center of any commercial products displayed or discussed in conjunction with an educational activity.

To access course evaluations, click here.

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